How Bankruptcy Code Handles Common Sole Proprietorships

There are several types of business ownership in the United States, from large corporations to sole proprietorships. When it comes to the bankruptcy code, each type of business is handled in a specific way. For almost every type of business, the owner’s debts are separated from the business bankruptcy case. However, because sole proprietorships are owned by one person or jointly by spouses, the business debts and personal debts are rolled into one bankruptcy case. If you own a sole proprietorship and are considering filing for bankruptcy, Behm Law Group Ltd. can help you navigate your case when facing the complex bankruptcy code in Waseca, MN, and the surrounding area.

Many types of businesses are commonly owned as sole proprietorships, typically they include:

  • Bookkeepers and financial planners
  • House cleaners
  • Landscapers
  • Home healthcare providers
  • Caterers
  • Hair stylists
  • Computer repair providers
  • Freelance writers
  • Tutors
  • Electricians

Of course, in addition to these common ones, there are many other types of businesses that can be run as sole proprietorships, and they will also have their debts as well as their owners’ personal debts included in a bankruptcy case. Those people who own a sole proprietorship and cannot repay their debts generally have two options for bankruptcy: Chapter 7 or Chapter 13.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy works to liquidate both business and personal non-exempt assets in exchange for the discharge of business and personal debts. Filers can claim exemptions to protect their assets from liquidation, including exemptions of a homestead, a motor vehicle, tools of the trade, and a wild card exemption that can be applied to miscellaneous property. In any Chapter 7 case, unsecured debts, like credit card debts, medical debts, debts to suppliers of material/products will be discharged in full. With secured debts (debts secured/guaranteed by collateral such as vehicle loans and mortgage loans), creditors can sometimes claim/take their collateral or a filer will simply agree to surrender the collateral back to them.  Any debt that remains after the collateral is liquidated or sold will be discharged.  For instance, if you owe $5,000.00 on a vehicle loan and the vehicle serving as collateral is worth only $1,000.00, the creditor could not pursue you for the $4,000.00 difference after it liquidated or sold the vehicle.   Sole proprietorship business owners who have filed for Chapter 7 can often protect most or all of their business equipment/machinery with their bankruptcy exemptions and can resume operating their businesses with considerably less debt.

Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a debt reorganization process. Business and personal debts are restructured into a repayment plan suited to the person’s income and lasting three to five years. While you work through your plan, you can continue to run your business, and you will even have some options to relegate funds for new equipment or repairs on facilities or tools that are necessary to continue normal business operations.

Whether you file for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy as a sole proprietorship, be prepared for your business debts and your personal debts to both be included in your case. To learn more about filing for bankruptcy and the bankruptcy code in Waseca, MN, call Behm Law Group Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 or email stephen@mankatobankruptcy.com.

 

Different Types of Bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN

Because the current time is full of uncertainties, any growing financial worries can add a tremendous amount of stress on a household. Whether you’re an individual, a family breadwinner, or a business owner, you can rest assured that when worst comes to worst, you will always have the option to file for bankruptcy if your financial circumstances call for it. Bankruptcy often gets a negative image cast over it, but the truth is that it’s a system designed to protect debtors, creditors, and the economic system overall with fair and just treatment to every party involved. If you are finding it impossible, or even just difficult, to meet debt payments each month, you can join thousands of other U.S. citizens who filed for bankruptcy and received permanent debt relief. With the help of Behm Law Group Ltd., you can build a strong case for Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 or Chapter 12 bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN, and start down your own road to a debt-free life.

At Behm Law Group, we work with individuals or joint-filing spouses going through Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcies. We also work with Minnesota family farmers and fishers to help them file for Chapter 12 relief. The different chapters/types of bankruptcy outlined in the code include:

  • Chapter 7: This process is for individuals or businesses of any size. It works to liquidate non-exempt assets in exchange for the discharge of debts. With most individual cases, the exemptions provided by the bankruptcy code protect one’s property from liquidation and all one loses are one’s debts.
  • Chapter 13: This bankruptcy is primarily for individuals, but sole proprietorship businesses can file by combining personal and business debts into one case. This process works to reorganize debts into a manageable repayment plan lasting three to five years that is tailored to one’s monthly income and reasonable and necessary monthly living expenses.
  • Chapter 12: This works like Chapter 13, but it is exclusively designed for family farmers and fishers who derive 50% of their yearly income from their farming/fishing operations.
  • Chapter 11: This is another reorganization bankruptcy, but it’s typically available to very large businesses that aren’t sole proprietorships or partnerships and to individuals who have a lot of property and have more than $419,275 of unsecured debts and more than $1,257,850 of secured debts. Chapter 11 typically costs more, takes longer, and involves more debts than the other reorganization bankruptcies.
  • Chapter 9: This bankruptcy process is for cities, towns, and other municipalities. The process protects the filing municipality from its creditors while a debt reorganization plan is drafted.
  • Chapter 15: This chapter applies to bankruptcies that cause cross-border insolvencies and is used when a filer has debts in the United States and in another country.

This is a brief explanation of the general chapters in the U.S. bankruptcy code. To learn more about bankruptcy law or to file for bankruptcy relief in Redwood Falls, MN, today, call Behm Law Group Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 or email at stephen@mankatobankruptcy.com.

Overview of the SBRA and Chapter 11 Bankruptcy for Small Businesses in Jackson, MN

The Small Business Reorganization Act (SBRA) was signed into law on August 23rd, 2019, and went into effect on February 19, 2020. For small businesses struggling with debts, this act could help them file for bankruptcy relief without the loss of their business in liquidation and without having to incur the extreme costs of a typical Chapter 11 reorganization bankruptcy case. The rules of the SBRA make it much less expensive for small businesses to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. If you’re considering filing a case as an individual or small business, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can help you file for Chapter 13, Chapter 11 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy relief in Jackson, MN and the surrounding area.

The SBRA provides subchapter rules to Chapter 11 that essentially lower the total cost of filing for businesses with debt loads equal to or less than $2,725,625.00 (excepting debts to affiliated parties or business insiders). Before this act, Chapter 11 business debt reorganization bankruptcy was considered so costly that most small businesses weren’t able to afford it.

Since the enactment of the SBRA, many small businesses now have the ability to file Chapter 11 and keep their company operations running rather than filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and having their businesses liquidated.

The first and foremost way the SBRA reduces costs of Chapter 11 for small businesses is by eliminating all fees except the initial filing fee. Other ways that costs are reduced include the following:

  • The court assigns a trustee to the small business case. This trustee acts similarly to a trustee in a Chapter 13 (reorganization bankruptcy for individuals) and helps keep the business on track for repayment throughout the case.
  • There is no appointed committee of creditors, and this eliminates costs of creditors’ legal professionals that the filer could be partially responsible for.
  • The repayment plan confirmation process is streamlined because the court will not require a disclosure statement that provides repayment details to creditors. This prevents possible contested hearings and extensions of the case that could add additional costs.
  • Finally, the SRBA reduces strict confirmation requirements for repayment plans. Plans will be approved as long as they don’t discriminate against specific creditors and the repayment amounts are reasonable with respect to projected monthly business income and projected monthly business expenses and the current debts of the business. This quick confirmation process prevents drawn out, costly back-and-forth interactions between creditors and the business filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy relief.

This brief overview of the changes made to Chapter 11 bankruptcy through the Small Business Reorganization Act is just a general look into the new law. To learn more on how the SBRA may affect your ability to file, you can view all the details on congress.gov.

For more information about filing for Chapter 13, Chapter 11 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy in Jackson, MN as an individual or as a business, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today or stephen@mankatobankruptcy.com.

Part Two: The American Shift in Bankruptcy Code

Part One of this blog covers the general history of bankruptcy laws from 1542 to 1776 in Europe and during the founding of the United States. The largest shift in the bankruptcy code occurred when Americans rewrote bankruptcy laws between 1776 and the 1800s. Before this American shift in the bankruptcy code, debtors were treated harshly, severely punished for debts and made vulnerable to creditors and the government. Today, the U.S. bankruptcy code is based on the American shift in how debtors are treated. Fair treatment of all parties involved in a bankruptcy case is the current ideal held up by the bankruptcy code. If you’re considering filing for bankruptcy, Behm Law Group Ltd. can guide you through the process and help you understand how the bankruptcy code in Luverne, MN, and the surrounding area works today.

 

After the founding of the United States in 1776 with the Declaration of Independence and the end of the American Revolution, legislators worked to develop new American laws, including establishing a shift in the bankruptcy code from the English standards. In the early nineteenth century, legislation for bankruptcy changed again to fit the rapidly fluctuating financial conditions and population in the United States.

 

1800: With the practice of U.S. law almost 30 years in, legislators could more effectively examine what was and wasn’t working. The lack of congressional control over bankruptcy was becoming an issue largely due to the economic depression in 1798, and the Bankruptcy Act of 1800 was a direct reaction to this financial crisis. The act followed English law much more closely than previous U.S. legislation, and it was repealed within three years due to its large unpopularity.

 

1841: After another financial crisis in the United States in 1837, legislators passed an act in 1841 that allowed for the filing of voluntary bankruptcies. Previously, bankruptcy cases were forced onto debtors who were unable to repay creditors. This was the second major shift of the U.S. bankruptcy code toward what we have today. However, this act was repealed in 1843 and wouldn’t be readdressed until the severe financial conditions following the Civil War. Similarly, the Bankruptcy Act of 1867 reinstated voluntary bankruptcy until its repeal in 1878.

 

1898: Despite many necessary revisions throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, the Bankruptcy Act of 1898 established the basics of the bankruptcy code we use today. This act offered voluntary bankruptcies to a wider range of people, allowed more composition agreements between creditors and debtors, redefined insolvency, mandated specific grounds for the discharge of debts and the sale of non-exempt assets, limited the number of bankruptcies one could file, and overall realigned the bankruptcy code to better fit into the economic system.

 

Since 1898, many major acts, such as the Chandler Act of 1938 and the BAPCPA of 2005, continue to redefine the bankruptcy code and make changes according to economic and consumer needs. Today, our bankruptcy system is a highly effective debt relief process that has helped millions regain financial well-being. To learn more about the bankruptcy code in Luverne, MN, contact Behm Law Group Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 or stephen@mankatobankruptcy.com.

 

Part One: The Beginnings of Bankruptcy Code from the Renaissance to the American Shift

If you have filed for bankruptcy before in Mankato, MN, or are working through a case now with the help of Behm Law Group Ltd., you know there are many intricacies of the bankruptcy code. Bankruptcy laws weren’t always so complex nor with fairness to all parties involved. Since the first semblances of the bankruptcy code starting in 1542, a lot about bankruptcy has changed.

 

1542:  After centuries of brutality against debtors, the first bankruptcy code was enacted in 1542 in the form of the Statute of Bankrupts. Put into place under the reign of King Henry VIII, the statute was an act of parliament and the first law to deal with bankruptcy. Broadly speaking, the act stated that debtors committing fraud (i.e. not making payments) should have all their assets seized and sold. The value of that sale would then be returned to creditors in amounts proportionate to the debts owed to them. While this form of bankruptcy law was less than fair to debtors, it was the first time something remotely resembling our bankruptcy code today was established.

 

1570: In 1570, Queen Elizabeth established the first modification to the still-young bankruptcy laws of England. The second of the English Bankruptcy Acts broadened and specified many of the offenses debtors could commit and the punishments therefore. Despite changes and clarifications, this act was still largely unfair to debtors.

 

1705: Under Queen Anne’s reign in 1705, the first signs of ease to debtors were established. In Queen Anne’s bankruptcy act, debtors had options for discharge and debt relief without the drastic consequences of the past. This departure was considered radical, but since then, every English bankruptcy law included some form of debtor relief provision.

 

1776: In this auspicious year, the United States of America declared independence from British rule, and the shift in bankruptcy law to what it is today began. To emphasize distance from English law, much of American legislation written in the early years of the United States was based on critical examination of what was wrong with how the parliament and monarchy operated. The lack of favor for the people in the English legislature was exactly the opposite of what the United States was founded on, and to shift away from that, every law was carefully outlined, including the bankruptcy code and the treatment of debtors. At this point, Congress had power to enact general bankruptcy legislation, but the standard for bankruptcy was to have each state establish the insolvency laws it saw fit.

 

The American shift away from English bankruptcy law was a significant and critical aspect of what our current bankruptcy code is based on. The fine-tuning and improvement on the American shift will be covered in the second part of this blog post. If you are seeking advice on how to file and navigate the bankruptcy code in Mankato, MN, or the surrounding area today, contact Behm Law Group Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 or stephen@mankatobankruptcy.com.

Protection of Disabled Veterans with the Extension of a Bankruptcy Code Bill

The U.S. federal government works in many ways to protect the rights and wellbeing of military veterans, recognizing their work and sacrifice for our country. Despite this, many veterans still struggle in different ways. Unless you’ve served the required minimum of 20 years, it’s likely that you aren’t on a government pension or health care plan that provides the support you need.

 

If you’re a veteran struggling to make ends meet financially, you are not alone. With the help of Behm Law Group, Ltd. you can file a successful bankruptcy case for long-term stability. Thanks to the bankruptcy code, in Owatonna, MN and across the country, veterans have certain rights throughout their bankruptcy filing process.

 

In August of 2019, the HAVEN (Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need) act was passed, allowing the protection of veteran disability payments as disposable income in bankruptcy cases. Creditors, trustees and debt collectors now cannot seize those funds if a disabled veteran files for bankruptcy. This bankruptcy code legislation means that these funds cannot legally be considered as the disposable income in a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 case.

 

In a Chapter 13 case, a filer’s debts are reorganized into a manageable repayment plan suited to their income. In this plan, disposable income and discretionary income are treated differently. If the filer’s veteran disability income is no longer considered disposable, the filer can use that money however they want during their repayment plan. In other words, the filer won’t have to use their veteran disability funds to make payments on their bankruptcy repayment plan unless they choose to do so.

 

In a Chapter 7 case, filer’s debts are discharged in exchange for the liquidation of their non-exempt assets. They are also allowed to claim various exemptions depending on their debt amounts to protect their home, car, and other properties. However, to qualify for Chapter 7, filers have to pass the Means Test. To pass this test, their income-to-debt ratio has to be below the state median income for a similar sized household. In the Means Test, the filer’s disposable income plays a part in determining their income-to-debt ratio. If a filer’s veteran disability income cannot be considered as disposable income, it might tip that ratio to qualify them for Chapter 7 when otherwise they would not be eligible.

 

The HAVEN act will protect the funds disabled veterans receive if they file for bankruptcy during the next four years. In 2023, the act will be reconsidered for potential changes, renewal, or termination. Learn more about the details of the 2019 HAVEN bill here. If you are considering filing for bankruptcy and are a disabled veteran receiving funds from the government, you can rest easy with the knowledge that the bankruptcy code in Owatonna, MN will protect that source of income.

 

To learn more about bankruptcy or to get started on your case today, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 or via email at stephen@mankatobankruptcy.com today.

Understanding Your Role According to the Bankruptcy Code in Worthington, MN if Your Landlord Goes Bankrupt

If an individual or business seeks debt relief in the form of bankruptcy, creditors, employees, tenants, and others around them are affected. If a landlord files for bankruptcy, for example, their tenants will be involved in the filing process to a certain extent. If you are a landlord struggling with debt, Behm Law Group, Ltd. offers counsel in filing for bankruptcy. On the other side of that coin, Behm Law Group, Ltd. also offers advice for tenants with a bankrupt landlord, providing important information regarding their role according to the bankruptcy code in Worthington, MN.

Landlords filing for bankruptcy will either file Chapter 7, Chapter 11, or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. For those that qualify for the asset liquidation process in return for debt discharge, Chapter 7 is the most common option. Both Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 offer a debt reorganization bankruptcy structure. Chapter 11 is designed to reorganize the debts of landlords that are not sole-proprietorships or partnerships (e.g. apartment complexes with multiple locations owned by a corporation). Chapter 13 bankruptcy, on the other hand, provides debt reorganization to many landlords who have a sole proprietorship or a partnership operation.

 

What to Expect as a Tenant

If your landlord files for bankruptcy, they have to inform all their tenants. When any bankruptcy case is opened, the court puts an automatic stay on collections from creditors, but it doesn’t mean you can stop paying rent. However, it does mean that if the property your landlord rents out is in foreclosure, that process is halted and your landlord retains ownership of the property. Because of this, you should continue to pay your landlord until you are notified by the bankruptcy trustee or the mortgage creditor itself that ownership of the property has changed. This change can occur in several ways:

 

  1. Your landlord’s mortgage lender can file a motion with the bankruptcy court to lift the automatic stay for that debt. If the motion is successful, the trustee or the mortgage lender itself will let you know who to pay rent to.
  2. If the case ends and your landlord’s property is liquidated, the ownership may change to the party that has purchased the property. If this occurs, the trustee will provide the information you need about your new landlord.
  3. If no one purchases the property, you will make payments to the trustee in the meantime.

 

If your landlord retains the property in their case, you will continue to make payments to them. If they do not retain it and another buyer plans to use the property for other purposes, you may be forced to move. You will be given fair warning and 90 days, or some other mutually agreeable time period, to find a new living situation.

 

The bankruptcy code can be difficult to navigate for all involved. In most cases, a bankrupt landlord will not affect tenants drastically, but it’s important to be aware of their financial status and the bankruptcy code in Worthington, MN. To learn more about filing for bankruptcy as a landlord, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

U.S. Bankruptcy Code in Redwood Falls, MN, and the Chandler Act of 1938

Since the establishment of the United States as an independent country, the laws of debt, lending, and bankruptcy have evolved into what they are today. With factors like social and cultural gravity, economic structures, population size and demographics, political leanings, and even religious ideologies, all of our country’s laws, including the bankruptcy code, have fluctuated and developed accordingly. When it comes to bankruptcy law, there have been several acts in the 20th century alone that led our courts to create what is the current bankruptcy code. If you’re considering filing for business or individual bankruptcy, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can provide legal assistance and guidance with today’s laws and bankruptcy code in Redwood Falls, MN.

 

Of the many significant changes to bankruptcy law made throughout the 20th century is the Chandler Act, also referred to as the Bankruptcy Act of 1938. In 1938, the U.S. was still struggling with many of the severe economic damages of the Great Depression. It was during this time that business failings and destitute homes were more prevalent than they had ever been before, and to this day are unmatched. Because of this economic strife, our country was seeing more and more cases of financial downfall that could have been prevented and/or remedied with government-sanctioned bankruptcy. Thus, in 1938 the Chandler Act was initiated.

 

Modern U.S. Bankruptcy Code and The Chandler Act

The basis of the Chandler Act reaches back to the Bankruptcy Act of 1898, which established the primary format of allowing debtors to file bankruptcy and receive protection from creditors. This 1898 law was the first of many groundbreaking bankruptcy-related acts of Congress. As an amendment to the 1898 act, the Chandler Act established a system that allowed voluntary bankruptcy filings for businesses and individuals alike.

 

Additionally, it was a foundational act for the role of bankruptcy trustees. By eliminating the participation of banks in the filing process, and instead assigning an objective trustee to oversee the case, the Chandler Act was one of the first to create a more accessible, fair bankruptcy option. With a trustee taking on the liquidation and reorganization tasks rather than an investment bank, many antiquated and potentially corruptible processes were dissolved.

 

Although the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 and the BAPCA of 2005 largely overhauled the bankruptcy laws of the past, the Chandler Act of 1938 will always be a milestone for our court system that marks a moment in history when we strove to move forward and continue to make our system of government one that is balanced and effective for U.S. citizens and businesses alike.

 

To learn more about how the current bankruptcy code in Redwood Falls, MN will structure the outcome of your case and how you can successfully navigate the waters of the bankruptcy court, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

How to Use Your Tax Refund While Filing for Bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN

As tax season approaches, everyone filing has to take time to look at their finances in more detail than usual. For many individuals and businesses, a financial overview may show just how much they are struggling with the weight of debt. For those with too much debt than they know what to do with, tax season may be the perfect time to consider a long-term solution. At Behm Law Group, Ltd., we’ve found that there are many cases where tax season was the most effective time for those considering filing for bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN to take the next step forward.

 

Whether you have credit card debt, mortgages, or most other forms of debt, filing for bankruptcy can act as a recovery system that helps you resolve those debts under government protection. For most with a steady income that overbalances their debt-to-income ratio, the process of Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the most effective as it restructures your debts into a three- to five-year repayment plan suited to your own financial situation.

 

Because of the demand that a Chapter 13 plan puts on all your disposable income, you will most likely have to forfeit some of your yearly tax refunds you receive to your trustee for the repayment of your unsecured debts. While your trustee may allot some of that refund for you to spend or save, you will not be able to retain all of it.  To get the most use out of your tax refund if you plan to file for bankruptcy, you should plan to use it before you file your petition.

 

If you use your tax refund prior to filing for bankruptcy, you will have to spend it all or you may have to surrender some of your tax refund to the trustee. To get full use of your refund without being at fault when the time comes to file, you should expect to only use the refund for:

 

  • food and prescription medicine
  • mortgage or rent
  • home maintenance and repairs
  • utilities
  • education costs
  • clothing
  • insurance
  • medical or dental costs
  • car payments, repairs, and maintenance
  • homeowners association fees

 

The best use of your tax refund if you plan on filing for bankruptcy is for it to go to these expenses. When you use your refund for these purposes, it’s also critical to keep accurate and legitimate records of all your spending. With the help of a Behm attorney, you can record and collect necessary information and documents that will fully demonstrate your use of your tax refund for these expenses rather than other debt payments. Your trustee will most likely require a tax return for the year prior to and the year you file for bankruptcy on top of the additional bankruptcy petition documents.

 Find Professional Help When Filing for Bankruptcy

To learn more about how to use your tax refund before filing for bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

Farms and Other Local Midwest Food Suppliers File for Chapter 12 Bankruptcy in Mankato, MN

Farming is a notoriously difficult profession even with the knowledge, tools, and power agriculturalists have access to today. Throughout the ages, farmers have faced challenges with the weather, soil conditions, seed fertility, plant diseases, pests, economy crashes, and many other variables. With all the hardships farmers face, it’s incredible there are so many strong people who still choose this vocation, and we have those hard workers to thank for the abundance of food in supermarkets and grocery stores across the country.

 

However, many farmers still face extreme financial hardship, and it’s no surprise that many find themselves deep in significant debt connected to their crop, livestock, or fishing operations. If you’re having difficulties as a family farmer or fisher, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can help you find your way out of severe debt by filing for Chapter 12 bankruptcy in Mankato, MN.

 

With the large spread of farmland dotting the countryside between Mankato and other cities in southern Minnesota, there are many local people living in our communities that took on farming as a profession. Unfortunately, this year has marked a rise of farm debts, not just in Minnesota, but across the Midwest as a whole.

 

Why Farm Debts Are on the Rise

 

Sometimes described as a “slow bleed” of independent farms in the face of low dairy, crop, fish, and meat prices, the debts of family farmers and fishers are not matched by the income they receive from product sales. When independent farms are higher in geographic concentration, as they often are, the trickle of each small farmer’s debts turns into a river of severe financial crisis. If this happens to a community, no matter how widespread, bankruptcy is a highly valuable solution. When farmers and fishers take advantage of the assistance filing for Chapter 12 bankruptcy provides, it serves as a true system of recovery and healing for agricultural communities.

 

Chapter 12 Bankruptcy

 

Chapter 12 bankruptcy is a debt relief option offered to family farmers and fishers who earn over 50% of their income from agricultural or fishing operations. If you file for Chapter 12, you are provided with a system of bankruptcy that reorganizes and restructures your debts in a manageable repayment plan suited to your income. This bankruptcy repayment plan is spread over a period of three to five years and allows for fluctuations in your income with the growing and harvest seasons. Not only does Chapter 12 give farmers and fishers a way to repay their debts without losing their land, home, agricultural equipment, and overall livelihood, it also provides protection against creditor harassment.

 

Farm debt may be on the rise due to several conditions in the food industry today, but there are solutions. Chapter 12 bankruptcy in Mankato, MN is one option that many can use to recover in the long-term from agricultural debt. To learn more about bankruptcy and debt relief, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.