Protection of Disabled Veterans with the Extension of a Bankruptcy Code Bill

The U.S. federal government works in many ways to protect the rights and wellbeing of military veterans, recognizing their work and sacrifice for our country. Despite this, many veterans still struggle in different ways. Unless you’ve served the required minimum of 20 years, it’s likely that you aren’t on a government pension or health care plan that provides the support you need.

 

If you’re a veteran struggling to make ends meet financially, you are not alone. With the help of Behm Law Group, Ltd. you can file a successful bankruptcy case for long-term stability. Thanks to the bankruptcy code, in Owatonna, MN and across the country, veterans have certain rights throughout their bankruptcy filing process.

 

In August of 2019, the HAVEN (Honoring American Veterans in Extreme Need) act was passed, allowing the protection of veteran disability payments as disposable income in bankruptcy cases. Creditors, trustees and debt collectors now cannot seize those funds if a disabled veteran files for bankruptcy. This bankruptcy code legislation means that these funds cannot legally be considered as the disposable income in a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 case.

 

In a Chapter 13 case, a filer’s debts are reorganized into a manageable repayment plan suited to their income. In this plan, disposable income and discretionary income are treated differently. If the filer’s veteran disability income is no longer considered disposable, the filer can use that money however they want during their repayment plan. In other words, the filer won’t have to use their veteran disability funds to make payments on their bankruptcy repayment plan unless they choose to do so.

 

In a Chapter 7 case, filer’s debts are discharged in exchange for the liquidation of their non-exempt assets. They are also allowed to claim various exemptions depending on their debt amounts to protect their home, car, and other properties. However, to qualify for Chapter 7, filers have to pass the Means Test. To pass this test, their income-to-debt ratio has to be below the state median income for a similar sized household. In the Means Test, the filer’s disposable income plays a part in determining their income-to-debt ratio. If a filer’s veteran disability income cannot be considered as disposable income, it might tip that ratio to qualify them for Chapter 7 when otherwise they would not be eligible.

 

The HAVEN act will protect the funds disabled veterans receive if they file for bankruptcy during the next four years. In 2023, the act will be reconsidered for potential changes, renewal, or termination. Learn more about the details of the 2019 HAVEN bill here. If you are considering filing for bankruptcy and are a disabled veteran receiving funds from the government, you can rest easy with the knowledge that the bankruptcy code in Owatonna, MN will protect that source of income.

 

To learn more about bankruptcy or to get started on your case today, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 or via email at stephen@mankatobankruptcy.com today.

Understanding Your Role According to the Bankruptcy Code in Worthington, MN if Your Landlord Goes Bankrupt

If an individual or business seeks debt relief in the form of bankruptcy, creditors, employees, tenants, and others around them are affected. If a landlord files for bankruptcy, for example, their tenants will be involved in the filing process to a certain extent. If you are a landlord struggling with debt, Behm Law Group, Ltd. offers counsel in filing for bankruptcy. On the other side of that coin, Behm Law Group, Ltd. also offers advice for tenants with a bankrupt landlord, providing important information regarding their role according to the bankruptcy code in Worthington, MN.

Landlords filing for bankruptcy will either file Chapter 7, Chapter 11, or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. For those that qualify for the asset liquidation process in return for debt discharge, Chapter 7 is the most common option. Both Chapter 11 and Chapter 13 offer a debt reorganization bankruptcy structure. Chapter 11 is designed to reorganize the debts of landlords that are not sole-proprietorships or partnerships (e.g. apartment complexes with multiple locations owned by a corporation). Chapter 13 bankruptcy, on the other hand, provides debt reorganization to many landlords who have a sole proprietorship or a partnership operation.

 

What to Expect as a Tenant

If your landlord files for bankruptcy, they have to inform all their tenants. When any bankruptcy case is opened, the court puts an automatic stay on collections from creditors, but it doesn’t mean you can stop paying rent. However, it does mean that if the property your landlord rents out is in foreclosure, that process is halted and your landlord retains ownership of the property. Because of this, you should continue to pay your landlord until you are notified by the bankruptcy trustee or the mortgage creditor itself that ownership of the property has changed. This change can occur in several ways:

 

  1. Your landlord’s mortgage lender can file a motion with the bankruptcy court to lift the automatic stay for that debt. If the motion is successful, the trustee or the mortgage lender itself will let you know who to pay rent to.
  2. If the case ends and your landlord’s property is liquidated, the ownership may change to the party that has purchased the property. If this occurs, the trustee will provide the information you need about your new landlord.
  3. If no one purchases the property, you will make payments to the trustee in the meantime.

 

If your landlord retains the property in their case, you will continue to make payments to them. If they do not retain it and another buyer plans to use the property for other purposes, you may be forced to move. You will be given fair warning and 90 days, or some other mutually agreeable time period, to find a new living situation.

 

The bankruptcy code can be difficult to navigate for all involved. In most cases, a bankrupt landlord will not affect tenants drastically, but it’s important to be aware of their financial status and the bankruptcy code in Worthington, MN. To learn more about filing for bankruptcy as a landlord, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

U.S. Bankruptcy Code in Redwood Falls, MN, and the Chandler Act of 1938

Since the establishment of the United States as an independent country, the laws of debt, lending, and bankruptcy have evolved into what they are today. With factors like social and cultural gravity, economic structures, population size and demographics, political leanings, and even religious ideologies, all of our country’s laws, including the bankruptcy code, have fluctuated and developed accordingly. When it comes to bankruptcy law, there have been several acts in the 20th century alone that led our courts to create what is the current bankruptcy code. If you’re considering filing for business or individual bankruptcy, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can provide legal assistance and guidance with today’s laws and bankruptcy code in Redwood Falls, MN.

 

Of the many significant changes to bankruptcy law made throughout the 20th century is the Chandler Act, also referred to as the Bankruptcy Act of 1938. In 1938, the U.S. was still struggling with many of the severe economic damages of the Great Depression. It was during this time that business failings and destitute homes were more prevalent than they had ever been before, and to this day are unmatched. Because of this economic strife, our country was seeing more and more cases of financial downfall that could have been prevented and/or remedied with government-sanctioned bankruptcy. Thus, in 1938 the Chandler Act was initiated.

 

Modern U.S. Bankruptcy Code and The Chandler Act

The basis of the Chandler Act reaches back to the Bankruptcy Act of 1898, which established the primary format of allowing debtors to file bankruptcy and receive protection from creditors. This 1898 law was the first of many groundbreaking bankruptcy-related acts of Congress. As an amendment to the 1898 act, the Chandler Act established a system that allowed voluntary bankruptcy filings for businesses and individuals alike.

 

Additionally, it was a foundational act for the role of bankruptcy trustees. By eliminating the participation of banks in the filing process, and instead assigning an objective trustee to oversee the case, the Chandler Act was one of the first to create a more accessible, fair bankruptcy option. With a trustee taking on the liquidation and reorganization tasks rather than an investment bank, many antiquated and potentially corruptible processes were dissolved.

 

Although the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978 and the BAPCA of 2005 largely overhauled the bankruptcy laws of the past, the Chandler Act of 1938 will always be a milestone for our court system that marks a moment in history when we strove to move forward and continue to make our system of government one that is balanced and effective for U.S. citizens and businesses alike.

 

To learn more about how the current bankruptcy code in Redwood Falls, MN will structure the outcome of your case and how you can successfully navigate the waters of the bankruptcy court, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

How to Use Your Tax Refund While Filing for Bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN

As tax season approaches, everyone filing has to take time to look at their finances in more detail than usual. For many individuals and businesses, a financial overview may show just how much they are struggling with the weight of debt. For those with too much debt than they know what to do with, tax season may be the perfect time to consider a long-term solution. At Behm Law Group, Ltd., we’ve found that there are many cases where tax season was the most effective time for those considering filing for bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN to take the next step forward.

 

Whether you have credit card debt, mortgages, or most other forms of debt, filing for bankruptcy can act as a recovery system that helps you resolve those debts under government protection. For most with a steady income that overbalances their debt-to-income ratio, the process of Chapter 13 bankruptcy is the most effective as it restructures your debts into a three- to five-year repayment plan suited to your own financial situation.

 

Because of the demand that a Chapter 13 plan puts on all your disposable income, you will most likely have to forfeit some of your yearly tax refunds you receive to your trustee for the repayment of your unsecured debts. While your trustee may allot some of that refund for you to spend or save, you will not be able to retain all of it.  To get the most use out of your tax refund if you plan to file for bankruptcy, you should plan to use it before you file your petition.

 

If you use your tax refund prior to filing for bankruptcy, you will have to spend it all or you may have to surrender some of your tax refund to the trustee. To get full use of your refund without being at fault when the time comes to file, you should expect to only use the refund for:

 

  • food and prescription medicine
  • mortgage or rent
  • home maintenance and repairs
  • utilities
  • education costs
  • clothing
  • insurance
  • medical or dental costs
  • car payments, repairs, and maintenance
  • homeowners association fees

 

The best use of your tax refund if you plan on filing for bankruptcy is for it to go to these expenses. When you use your refund for these purposes, it’s also critical to keep accurate and legitimate records of all your spending. With the help of a Behm attorney, you can record and collect necessary information and documents that will fully demonstrate your use of your tax refund for these expenses rather than other debt payments. Your trustee will most likely require a tax return for the year prior to and the year you file for bankruptcy on top of the additional bankruptcy petition documents.

 Find Professional Help When Filing for Bankruptcy

To learn more about how to use your tax refund before filing for bankruptcy in Redwood Falls, MN, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

Farms and Other Local Midwest Food Suppliers File for Chapter 12 Bankruptcy in Mankato, MN

Farming is a notoriously difficult profession even with the knowledge, tools, and power agriculturalists have access to today. Throughout the ages, farmers have faced challenges with the weather, soil conditions, seed fertility, plant diseases, pests, economy crashes, and many other variables. With all the hardships farmers face, it’s incredible there are so many strong people who still choose this vocation, and we have those hard workers to thank for the abundance of food in supermarkets and grocery stores across the country.

 

However, many farmers still face extreme financial hardship, and it’s no surprise that many find themselves deep in significant debt connected to their crop, livestock, or fishing operations. If you’re having difficulties as a family farmer or fisher, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can help you find your way out of severe debt by filing for Chapter 12 bankruptcy in Mankato, MN.

 

With the large spread of farmland dotting the countryside between Mankato and other cities in southern Minnesota, there are many local people living in our communities that took on farming as a profession. Unfortunately, this year has marked a rise of farm debts, not just in Minnesota, but across the Midwest as a whole.

 

Why Farm Debts Are on the Rise

 

Sometimes described as a “slow bleed” of independent farms in the face of low dairy, crop, fish, and meat prices, the debts of family farmers and fishers are not matched by the income they receive from product sales. When independent farms are higher in geographic concentration, as they often are, the trickle of each small farmer’s debts turns into a river of severe financial crisis. If this happens to a community, no matter how widespread, bankruptcy is a highly valuable solution. When farmers and fishers take advantage of the assistance filing for Chapter 12 bankruptcy provides, it serves as a true system of recovery and healing for agricultural communities.

 

Chapter 12 Bankruptcy

 

Chapter 12 bankruptcy is a debt relief option offered to family farmers and fishers who earn over 50% of their income from agricultural or fishing operations. If you file for Chapter 12, you are provided with a system of bankruptcy that reorganizes and restructures your debts in a manageable repayment plan suited to your income. This bankruptcy repayment plan is spread over a period of three to five years and allows for fluctuations in your income with the growing and harvest seasons. Not only does Chapter 12 give farmers and fishers a way to repay their debts without losing their land, home, agricultural equipment, and overall livelihood, it also provides protection against creditor harassment.

 

Farm debt may be on the rise due to several conditions in the food industry today, but there are solutions. Chapter 12 bankruptcy in Mankato, MN is one option that many can use to recover in the long-term from agricultural debt. To learn more about bankruptcy and debt relief, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

Why Filing for Bankruptcy is an Effective Long-Term Solution for Credit Repair in Marshall, MN

Every day, American adults are faced with the cost of living no matter where they’re located or what job they have. A large portion of the cost of living we all face is the existence of debts as a regular factor in many parts of our lives. From mortgages to cars, we all hold some debt that requires monthly payments. Without a structured budget and plan for repaying the debt in accordance with other monthly expenses, it’s easy to accumulate more and more financial pressure. If you find yourself facing unmanageable debt and don’t know what path to take to recover, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can give you the help you need to file for bankruptcy and start the process of long-term credit repair in Marshall, MN.

 The Truth About Bankruptcy & Credit Repair

Filing for bankruptcy has a poor public image when it comes to credit repair. While this is in part a realistic concern for those considering filing, it has often been overshadowed by the long-term benefits it provides. Bankruptcy is a highly effective, government-sanctioned remedy for resolving and recovering from a wide variety of debts.

 

Whether you choose to file for debt reorganization or liquidation bankruptcy as an individual consumer or a business, you can start down the path to stabilizing your finances while learning about how debts and incomes function in your life.

 

Consider the following facts that occur when you file for bankruptcy:

 

The Bad:

  1. Bankruptcy will damage your credit score. Based on the FICO credit score calculation model, filing may lower your score from 100 to 200 points.
  2. Records of a bankruptcy filing will stay on public record for up to ten years, depending on which chapter you file for.

 

The Good:

  1. Despite affecting your credit negatively at first and being on your public record for years, the damaging effect that filing for bankruptcy has on your credit will start to diminish immediately after filing.
  2. Your credit score may be improved to its original standing or recover to an even better score within a few years of filing. Some filers even report a restored credit score five years after filing.
  3. Whether you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and have debts discharged in exchange for asset liquidation or choose Chapter 13 debt reorganization and a three to five-year repayment plan, you can start rebuilding your credit right away.
  4. Rebuilding your credit during and after bankruptcy takes as little effort as budgeting, making debt payments on time, taking note of what you learn in pre-bankruptcy credit counseling, and making cautious spending choices.
  5. When bankruptcy is removed from public record, it can never affect your credit or financial standing again.

 

Bankruptcy is designed to help the individual consumer or business recover from debts and re-enter the economic system as a valuable participant. It is not designed to trap debtors or leave Americans destitute, despite popular belief.

 

If you’re ready to resolve your debts for long-term credit repair in Marshall, MN, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

Understanding Personal Guarantees and Liability When You File for Business Bankruptcy in Luverne, MN

If you own a small business anywhere in the U.S., your livelihood depends on countless factors ranging from market competitors to economic recessions. Maintaining a business with a steady flow of income and output of products or services is difficult, even with a strong foundation. No matter how old or young your business is, it’s possible to face financial struggles. If you’re having a hard time making debt payments from month-to-month, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can help you decide whether filing for business bankruptcy in Luverne, MN, is the right choice for your business.

Filing for business bankruptcy is a highly effective way to recover from severe debt. When you file for a business bankruptcy, you can choose Chapter 7 and liquidate your assets (shutting down your business in the process), or you can file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy and propose a restructuring of your debts into a manageable repayment plan (allowing your business to continue operating as you repay debts under the supervision of a bankruptcy trustee).

Whichever type of bankruptcy you file for, your trustee will rigorously examine your case for information about your past finances, business format, debts, income, living expenses, and contract agreements with your creditors. This examination determines how your assets will be liquidated and your debts discharged or restructured. Once your trustee has all the necessary information submitted with your petition and you have met all pre-bankruptcy requirements (credit counseling, bankruptcy fees, Means Test, and 341 hearing), the liquidation process will being in a chapter 7 case or you will propose a repayment plan in a chapter 13 case.

Behm attorneys can work with you to draft a repayment plan taking into account all your debts (priority, secured, and unsecured) and determine which debts you are liable to repay in full or have discharged in part from 0%-100%. One concern many business owners have in bankruptcy is whether they’ll be personally liable for the debts their business cannot repay. In the majority of cases, you will be personally responsible to pay debts your business can’t because it’s likely you made a personal guarantee agreement with your creditor when the loan was given.

Personal Guarantee: When you make a business loan agreement, the creditor needs to know they are protected in the event you cannot repay that debt. To resolve this issue, most creditors will not extend loans to businesses without requiring the owner to sign a personal guarantee agreement stating they are responsible as an individual to repay that debt in the event their business can’t meet payments.

Personally Liable: In short, you will be personally liable for your business debt when you file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy if:

  1. You have a sole proprietorship
  2. You have a partnership
  3. You made a personal guarantee on a debt

To learn more about filing for business bankruptcy in Luverne, MN, or to find out about personal guarantees and debt liability, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

Why Some Debts Are Exempt from Your Case When You File for Bankruptcy in Windom, MN

For hundreds of years, bankruptcy was wrongfully associated with morally unsound citizens who could not manage their finances. The reality, however, is that people are stuck with debt because of a wide range of circumstances. Today, individuals can accrue debt from more sources than ever before—from credit cards to student loans to medical costs. You are not alone if you are struggling to meet debt payments each month, and like many other debtors in the United States, you can recover financial stability in your life by filing for bankruptcy. With the help of Behm Law Group, Ltd. in Windom, MN, you can decide which type of bankruptcy is right for you and build a strong case to resolve your debt.

Filing for bankruptcy is a viable solution for many debts but be aware that some debts are not dischargeable through the bankruptcy process. The majority of debts the common U.S. individual holds can be included in all bankruptcy formats, including Chapter 7 and Chapter 13. These bankruptcy formats include debt from credit cards, medical bills, mortgages, bad checks, old utility bills, and car loans—all debts that cause individuals to file for bankruptcy at the highest frequency.

Unusual Debts When You File for Bankruptcy

Debts that may not be discharged when you file for bankruptcy range from unusual debts, like malicious misconduct debts, to even the most common type of debt in America, student loans. Sometimes student loans can be discharged but one must actually commence a law suit against the student loan company and prove to the bankruptcy court that the student loan will impose a financial undue hardship going forward. Such law suits can be both expensive and protracted.

Exempt Debts

The following list of debts is not comprehensive, but covers the most prevalent in the United States that are typically not discharged in the bankruptcy process:

  1. Student Loans Where Undue Hardship is Not Proven
  2. Child support and alimony debts
  3. Most tax debts
  4. Some debts owed to government agencies such as the Environmental Protection Agency for environmental hazards
  5. Reckless or malicious misconduct debts (for example, a debt in a lawsuit against you for injuries caused by drunk driving)
  6. Other forms of restitution debt
  7. Wages owed to your employees

So why are these specific debts not discharged in the bankruptcy process when so many others are? When considering each type of debt individually, the answer is a complex legal issue that takes into consideration other debts, other parties involved, location, and much more. However, if we take a look at all these debts together, we can see they have one thing in common: All these debts directly affect the well-being of another person or the well-being of the government as an entity that protects and supports the individual American.

If the bankruptcy process allowed the discharge or restructuring of these debts, it could significantly harm another person who has no direct responsibility for the cause to file for bankruptcy. While there are certain exceptions that include some of these debts in your bankruptcy case, they are most often excluded to protect innocent people in your life and the government that, in turn, protects people across the country.

Find Professional Help When You File for Bankruptcy

If you are uncertain whether or not you should file for bankruptcy in Windom, MN, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 to learn more about the process and your own situation today.

Bankruptcy Fees Today and Special Fee Circumstances for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy in Pipestone, MN

Filing for bankruptcy may seem like a drastic measure, but it’s actually a highly effective way for individuals to recover from severe financial difficulties and regain stability in more ways than one. The process of bankruptcy is designed to benefit both the debtor and the creditors involved in the case with a court administered application of either asset liquidation in return for debt discharge or debt reorganization into a manageable repayment plan. Whether you’re struggling with unexpected, sudden debts or you have accumulated debts over time, Behm Law Group, Ltd. provides the legal counsel and support you need to file a successful case for Chapter 13 bankruptcy or Chapter 7 bankruptcy in Pipestone, MN.

No matter what type of bankruptcy you file for, liquidation or reorganization, the court will require you to meet several requirements in order to submit your petition, including paying the current bankruptcy fees.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Fees

The filing fee itself for Chapter 7 bankruptcy is $335.  If your case is closed and you have grounds to reopen it later, you will have to pay another $335 fee.

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy Fees

To file a Chapter 13 petition, you’ll be required to pay a filing fee of $310. To reopen a Chapter 13 case, you’ll have to pay another fee of $310.

Any additional bankruptcy fees and information about putting together your petition are provided on the U.S. Court website, including all the necessary forms and files you need to file.

If you’re struggling so severely that even these initial bankruptcy fees are outside of your budget, the court offers two options. You can apply to pay the filing fee in installments or you can apply to have the filing fee waived completely. In order to qualify for an installment plan you have to state your inability to pay the fee upfront and you must be able to pay it within no more than four installments. To qualify for a waived fee your income must be 150% below the Minnesota poverty line and you must be unable to pay an installment plan.

In the event you can’t pay the bankruptcy fee upfront, it’s almost certain that you’ll have to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Because of case requirements and the fact that you’ll still repay some of your debts during a Chapter 13 repayment plan, filers with incomes too low for even bankruptcy filing fees are not expected to choose reorganization as a viable bankruptcy option. Conversely, if you have an income high enough to pay the bankruptcy filing fee, you may well not qualify for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

To learn more about the fees involved in filing for Chapter 13 or Chapter 7 bankruptcy in Pipestone, MN, or to get started on your case, contact Behm Law Group, Ltd. at (507) 387-7200 today.

 

Understanding When and Why a Trustee Looks for Fraud and How to Avoid Mistakes in Filing for Bankruptcy in St. Peter, MN

Bankruptcy is a balanced system designed to help debtors recover from severe financial struggles and reenter the economic system as a productive consumer while remaining fair to creditors to whom debts are owed. The U.S. Bankruptcy Court oversees the outcome of bankruptcy cases for both individuals and businesses filing for bankruptcy, but the case details are handled through an appointed bankruptcy trustee. If you’re considering filing for bankruptcy in St. Peter, MN, Behm Law Group, Ltd. can help you build a strong case.

 

One of the things trustees are highly efficient in finding within a bankruptcy case is evidence or potential for fraud. While most incidents of fraudulent behavior in a bankruptcy case are intentional, there are times when mistakes or misunderstandings can lead to a technical fraud. Understanding when and why a trustee determines an action is fraud is an important step to protecting yourself when filing for bankruptcy.

 

What is Considered Fraud When Filing for Bankruptcy?

 

There are several actions and events that can be directly or indirectly considered fraud in an individual consumer or business bankruptcy case. When this fraud is intentional, it’s generally straightforward for a trustee to dismiss a case based on those actions and events. Direct, intentional bankruptcy fraud most often includes:

 

  • Lying and falsifying documents of financial records such as records of personal loans
  • Purposefully filing incorrect bankruptcy forms
  • Falsely reporting income amounts
  • Hiding assets and accounts
  • Lying under oath
  • Transferring accounts and assets to other parties to hide them from creditors and your trustee
  • Creating a fake identity to hide assets or otherwise lie
  • Bribing your trustee, creditors, or court officials to your benefit
  • Embezzling any amount from your bankruptcy estate

 

These actions and events are the common types of fraud a bankruptcy trustee will base a case dismissal on, but there are other fraudulent behaviors that may occur. Indirect fraud is often caused by ignorance of your circumstances or mistakes in your bankruptcy documents. With the expert advice and assistance of Behm attorneys, you can avoid unintentional fraud including:

 

  • Missing bankruptcy forms or financial document records from your petition
  • Forgetting to pay bankruptcy fees or not understanding which fees apply to your case
  • Filing incorrect or incomplete financial information and bankruptcy forms
  • Missing deadlines or appointments accidentally
  • Building an infeasible Chapter 13 repayment plan
  • Failing to report changes in employment or income (as long as it was not intentional)
  • Attempting to apply exemptions where they cannot be applied
  • Any other unintentional signs of fraud that are caused by a lack of understanding of the requirements of filing for bankruptcy or simply by mistake

 How Professional Counsel Helps You When Filing for Bankruptcy

When you work with Behm attorneys, you can trust us to help you build a strong case and eliminate any potential for mistakes in your documents and forms. With the protection and counseling we provide, you can rest easy on your road to debt relief through the bankruptcy process.

 

To get started with Behm Law Group, Ltd. or to learn more about filing for bankruptcy in St. Peter, MN, contact us at (507) 387-7200 today.